Online dating marriage divorce statistics


19-Jun-2017 20:54

The researchers addressed the question of marital satisfaction in a nationally representative sample of 19,131 respondents who got married between 20.Results indicate that more than one-third of marriages in America now begin online. In addition, the study shows that marriages that started online, when compared with those that began through traditional offline venues, were slightly less likely to result in a marital breakup (separation or divorce) and were associated with slightly higher marital satisfaction among those respondents who remained married.Couples who hit it off online are less likely get married."Even though a large percentage of marriages in recent years have resulted from couples meeting online, looking for partners online may potentially suppress the desire for getting married," says lead study author Dr. According to the new study, 86 percent of online daters are cautious to trust people they meet online for fear they are receiving false information.However, some experts took issue with the findings because the survey was commissioned by e Harmony.com, the dating site that attracted one quarter of all online marriages according to the research.Cacioppo acknowledged being a "paid scientific advisor" for the website, but said the researchers followed procedures provided by the Journal of the American Medical Association and agreed to oversight by independent statisticians."Nothing can replace the old-tested principles of time and intimacy and letting things develop." Preach!

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"The time-tested qualities of trust and intimacy still remain important factors on determining whether a couple stays together, regardless of whether they meet offline or online," says Brenda K.

I think the best outcome of this study was to show that 35% of marriages now begin online. Aditi Paul, a Ph D candidate at Michigan State, did a study this past year claiming quite the opposite, but ultimately differentiating people’s outcomes by their intentions.

Her abstract says that previous studies, including the one I mentioned above, have primarily looked at marital relationships.

Her study extends this investigation by including non-marital relationships in the comparison.

It investigates if the breakup rate of relationships (both marital and non-marital) varies as a result of meeting online versus offline, and if other factors outside of the meeting venue predict relationship dissolution.

Obviously the actual quality and duration of the relationship turned out to also be significant factors that predicted if couples would stay together or break up.